Live Like a Heroine

Here’s why I love Dry Brushing + a review

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Our Managing Editor Margherita shares her love for Dry Brushing: a simple yet effective ritual perfect to boost your mood while keeping your skin soft and your body toned.

My love for dry brushing blossomed the day I decided to add another step in my already dangerously long beauty routine.
Doubtful but very curious at the same time, I decided to try on my skin (literally) this ancient detox ritual that in recent years has conquered an ever-increasing number of supporters. Here are my thoughts.
Let’s start with the facts: dry brushing is a daily self-care ritual that promises healthy skin and energizes body&mind. This ancient Ayurvedic technique is known for its ability to exfoliate, increase blood circulation and lymph flow, while encouraging cell renewal, and helping the body detoxify itself naturally. In addition, regular dry brushing is considered an effective method to prevent and reduce the appearance of cellulite and to make your tan look better and last longer.
Sounds good to me.
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When I first approached the world of dry brushing, I had to quickly overcome some slight perplexities: for example, the best time for this ritual in the morning, as soon as you wake up - aka the time of day when the very idea of getting up from bed seems sufficiently arduous, let alone to brush energetically the whole body with a hard bristle brush. However, I have to say, once you get the gist of it, it really works wonders at waking up and energizing the body.
Dry brushing per se is not hard at all – you simply must brush your whole body gently but firmly in long strokes towards your heart, usually going over each area two or three times. At your belly, you brush in a clockwise motion. You can also brush your face with a specific, more gentle, and smaller brush, starting from the center of the face and moving outwards.
 
What I do is I follow with a quick shower, a slap of moisturizer and I’m ready to conquer my day, no matter how hard it might be. The dry-brushing makes my skin feel much softer, and any moisturizing treatment that I apply afterward penetrates much deeper and is more effective. I also find it very uplifting, and a great way to start the day feeling positive and bright.
 
There are many different styles of brushes you can choose from: with a long handle, without a handle, with gentle or rough bristles.
 
The brushes I’ve tried and loved are all from Ruhi. First of all, they are handcrafted and made in Germany by a small family-owned company that employs sustainable practices, using beech wood from responsibly managed forests and natural bristles that are ethically sourced. As a plus, they come in the loveliest plastic-free boxes made from recycled paper, and the ink used for printing is environmentally friendly.
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The brand was founded in 2019 by Berlin-based skincare enthusiast Britta Hekmat– who I’ve had the pleasure to meet, she is absolutely lovely – and was inspired by traditional self-care rituals such as dry brush massages, cupping treatments, and facial massage techniques: “With Ruhi, I would like to inspire women (and men!) to transform their skincare routine, turning it into a mindful self-care ritual, as well as invite them to take some time for themselves again and discover their natural glow.”
 
Some hero products from the line? The Ionic Dry Brush combines traditional brushing with next-level science: the ultra-thin copper bristles create negatively charged ions directly on the skin that harmonize its energy-levels, fight free radicals and revitalize the body.
Another favorite is the stunning Facial Dry Brush: this small tool provides your daily ritual for smooth, firm, and glowing skin while leaving the complexion refreshed, energized, and ready to absorb your skincare products.
You want to try dry brushing but have very sensitive skin? Try Ruhi’s signature Dry Brush – the perfect tool to exfoliate the skin without being too harsh.
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Share your Self-love routines on Instagram @margheritafresilli, @muse_and_heroine and @ruhirituals.
Credits Ph: Veronika Haslinger ; Mirko Morelli.